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An Introduction to Zoology:  Chapter 2
An Introduction to Zoology: Chapter 2
Published by The Lone Ranger
07-31-2008
Default Introduction

An Introduction to Zoology

Chapter Two: Animal Characteristics:



What Is an Animal?:
As mentioned in the first chapter, “zoology” is the study of animals. So, the natural question to ask is, “What is an animal?”. Well, animals are generally agreed to share four distinguishing characteristics. First, all animals are eukaryotes. Second, all animals are heterotrophs that ingest their food. Third, all animals are multicellular, and their cells are usually specialized to perform different functions. And finally, almost all animals show embryonic development.

We’ll consider each of these characteristics in turn.

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Thanks, from:
Corona688 (08-09-2008), Crumb (08-01-2008), Stormlight (11-13-2008)
  #1  
By cappuccino on 07-31-2008, 04:27 PM
Default Re: An Introduction to Zoology: Chapter Two

Thank you for the lesson in zoology, I've learned a few new things. Would the term nymph be applicable to young human children?
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  #2  
By The Lone Ranger on 08-01-2008, 12:15 AM
Default Re: An Introduction to Zoology: Chapter Two

Thanks!

Most people use the term "nymph" when referring to juvenile insects (those that have direct development), crustaceans or the like. I've never seen it used for a vertebrate.

Cheers,

Michael
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  #3  
By Dingfod on 08-01-2008, 03:28 AM
Default Re: An Introduction to Zoology: Chapter Two

If they did call children nymphs, wouldn't that make people that are crazy about children nymphomaniacs?
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  #4  
By Corona688 on 08-09-2008, 10:04 PM
Default Re: An Introduction to Zoology: Chapter Two

Quote:
Their relative inefficiency may be one reason why almost all prokaryotes are single-celled (unicellular) organisms.
Interesting, I did not know there were multicellular prokaryotes. Though 'multicellular' seems a bit of a stretch when all they do is clump together in a ball while they wait for less dry times.
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  #5  
By The Lone Ranger on 11-10-2008, 07:20 PM
Default Re: An Introduction to Zoology: Chapter 2

Actually, some cyanobacteria are truly multicellular, and even have some specialization of cells.

As a rule, though, multicellularity is extremely rare in prokaryotes.

Cheers,

Michael
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