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  #1626  
Old 06-23-2022, 08:35 AM
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Default Re: Drive by science

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It would be like if humans reproduced by suddenly growing an appendage which was then dipped into lava where it would melt off but not before depositing hardened heat resistant crystal eggs.
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Don't forget that this lava-crystal process is only done by humans who had resulted from permanent physical mergers of humans who had hatched from such crystals, in an alternation of generations.
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  #1627  
Old 06-23-2022, 07:30 PM
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Why do it once when you can do it multiple times! This little one was the size of the eye of a needle yesterday at this time, but luckily I was prepared enough to get a real photo.

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  #1628  
Old 06-30-2022, 02:50 AM
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Thread on ancient wolf DNA and genetics of dog domestication

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  #1629  
Old 07-12-2022, 04:39 PM
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Default Re: Drive by science




We have all seen this picture by now and I think most of us probably know that it shows gravitational lensing.
Quote:
Asked by Mandl to publish on the subject of gravitational lensing, Einstein at first declined, citing the fact that the phenomenon was unobservable. But Mandl persevered, and eventually, Einstein agreed to a brief publication in the journal Science:


In this brief note, Einstein also presented formulae for the optical properties of a gravitational lens. They are the exact same formulae which he had derived some 24 years earlier, right down to the formula for the magnification factor. Mandl receives an honourable mention as the person who had asked Einstein to derive and publish these results.


A brief history of gravitational lensing « Einstein-Online

Eventually we discovered quasars which turned out to be galaxies and we were able to find evidence of lensing.

Quote:

The first gravitational lens was found in 1979 by Dennis Walsh, Robert F. Carswell and Ray J. Weymann, who identified the double quasar Q0957+561 as a double image of one and the same distant quasar, produced by a gravitational lens.
Einstein initially thought of double images, but reality is more complex with Einstein crosses (4 images) and rings also being possible.
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  #1630  
Old 07-13-2022, 08:26 AM
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Default Re: Drive by science

Yesterday and today was a "supermoon," so I spent some time trying to get a picture. This is pretty heavily edited and cropped, but it looks pretty good.

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  #1631  
Old 08-01-2022, 07:10 PM
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Default Re: Drive by science

Every day is getting shorter / Never seem to find the time

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On 29 June this year, Earth racked up an unusual record: its shortest day since the 1960s, when scientists began measuring the planet’s rotation with high-precision atomic clocks.
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According to Nasa, stronger winds in El Niño years can slow down the planet’s spin, extending the day by a fraction of a millisecond. Earthquakes, on the other hand, can have the opposite effect. The 2004 earthquake that unleashed a tsunami in the Indian Ocean shifted enough rock to shorten the length of the day by nearly three microseconds.

Anything that moves mass towards the centre of the Earth will speed up the planet’s rotation, much as a spinning ice skater speeds up when they pull in their arms. Geological activity that pushes mass outwards from the centre will have the opposite effect and slow down the spin.
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  #1632  
Old 08-08-2022, 02:07 AM
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I saw a lovely hawk of some kind perched in a tree by my backyard. I took a bunch of photos, and while I was processing them today, I noticed two bands on the bird. Curious, I searched about this, and discovered I can report this to the USGS. If I had known about the band, I probably would have actually tried to get a better shot of them.

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  #1633  
Old 08-08-2022, 09:06 AM
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Default Re: Drive by science

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and discovered I can report this to the USGS.
The US Geological Survey?
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  #1634  
Old 08-10-2022, 08:21 PM
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Default Re: Drive by science

Do Jumping Spiders dream of eight legged sheep?
Jumping spiders may experience something like REM sleep | Ars Technica

ArsTechnica Just as you might see in a mammal, the spiders experienced periodic periods of rapid eye movement—albeit involving the movement of retinal tubes. Although these events varied a bit from instance to instance and between individuals, they generally lasted similar amounts of time, and they repeated with a period that was similarly consistent.

Perhaps more significantly, the retinal tube movements were frequently associated with twitching or curling of the spiders' legs. Only about 40 percent of the periods of eye movement were associated with leg twitching, but every leg twitching that happened over the sleep period was associated with eye movement.

It's not clear that this behavior represents REM because it performs the same function as REM sleep does in humans (something we're still working to understand). But physically, the hallmarks seem to be there, which has some significant implications. "That these characteristic REM sleep-like behaviors exist in a highly visual, long-diverged lineage further challenges our understanding of this sleep state," the researchers note. This is especially true given that other researchers have published findings of REM-like behavior in distantly related animals like cuttlefish.


In humans the rapid eye movement of REM sleep is thought to be because muscle paralysis happens bellow the nerves that control eye movements and that some/many/all (unknown) are from looking around in a dream. (There have been a few studies on Lucid dreamers where they were able to communicate to the outside world by looking around in the dream in a specific pattern.)

The amazing thing is that Spiders and Humans diverged quite some time ago, if this is REM sleep in a spider it either means REM sleep is even more base level than we thought and effects all neuron based neural networks, or it’s so good at whatever it’s doing convergent evolution has evolved it multiple times.
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  #1635  
Old 08-11-2022, 06:17 AM
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Default Re: Drive by science

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and discovered I can report this to the USGS.
The US Geological Survey?
Yes, the US Geological Survey. I don't know why they're doing it and not the US Fish and Wildlife Service.
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  #1636  
Old 08-11-2022, 07:15 AM
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Default Re: Drive by science

That’s a nice shot!

I was curious so I did some searching. It would appear Bird Banding Laboratories was under Fish and Wildlife from 1920 until 1993, where the Interior picked a bunch of groups from different divisions to form a new one, the NBS, National Biological Service. It wavered especially under Republican control and in 1996 instead of being undone entirely it had its budget reduced and was put under the control of the USGS, as their Biological Resources Division, specifically to protect it from further Republican cuts. The banding group itself seems to have changed little besides gaining advantage of new fangled computer programing and internet connectivity the USGS brought along with it in the 90s.

Whatever happened to the National Biological Survey? | BioScience | Oxford Academic
BY ANY NAME, BIOLOGICAL SERVICE APPEARS TO BE ENDANGERED SPECIES - The Washington Post
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  #1637  
Old 08-15-2022, 10:06 PM
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I’ve seen a few articles so far on this, it seems to be a slow simmer that is soon to boil over.

Did Alzheimer’s research get Wakefielded? It’s sounds more and more likely that the research paper’s pointing to the Amyloid Beta plaque theory of Alzheimers, fabricated data.

Potential fabrication in research images threatens key theory of Alzheimers disease | Science | AAAS

Science.org But even before Schrag’s investigation, the spotty evidence that Aβ*56 plays a role in Alzheimer’s had raised eyebrows. Wilcock has long doubted studies that claim to use “purified” Aβ*56. Such oligomers are notoriously unstable, converting to other oligomer types spontaneously. Multiple types can be present in a sample even after purification efforts, making it hard to say any cognitive effects are due to Aβ*56 alone, she notes—assuming it exists. In fact, Wilcock and others say, several labs have tried and failed to find Aβ*56, although few have published those findings. Journals are often uninterested in negative results, and researchers can be reluctant to contradict a famous investigator.

An exception was Harvard University’s Dennis Selkoe, a leading advocate of the amyloid and toxic oligomer hypotheses, who has cited the Nature paper at least 13 times. In two 2008 papers, Selkoe said he could not find Aβ*56 in human fluids or tissues.

Selkoe examined Schrag’s dossier on Lesné’s papers at Science’s request, and says he finds it credible and well supported. He did not see manipulation in every suspect image, but says, “There are certainly at least 12 or 15 images where I would agree that there is no other explanation” than manipulation. One—an image in the Nature paper displaying purified Aβ*56—shows “very worrisome” signs of tampering, Selkoe says. The same image reappeared in a different paper, co-authored by Lesné and Ashe, 5 years later. Many other images in Lesné’s papers might be improper—more than enough to challenge the body of work, Selkoe adds.
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  #1638  
Old 08-27-2022, 08:42 PM
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I learned about "moon trees" today:

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Apollo 14 launched in the late afternoon of January 31, 1971 on what was to be our third trip to the lunar surface. Five days later Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell walked on the Moon while Stuart Roosa, a former U.S. Forest Service smoke jumper, orbited above in the command module. Packed in small containers in Roosa's personal kit were hundreds of tree seeds, part of a joint NASA/USFS project. Upon return to Earth, the seeds were germinated by the Forest Service. Known as the "Moon Trees", the resulting seedlings were planted throughout the United States (often as part of the nation's bicentennial in 1976) and the world. They stand as a tribute to astronaut Roosa and the Apollo program.
The Moon Trees
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  #1639  
Old 09-01-2022, 01:33 PM
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:twiddle:
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  #1640  
Old 09-01-2022, 04:59 PM
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Default Re: Drive by science

Sad trombone.

KIC 9832227 - Wikipedia

And nothing happened.
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  #1641  
Old 09-01-2022, 08:57 PM
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Default Re: Drive by science

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ari View Post
I’ve seen a few articles so far on this, it seems to be a slow simmer that is soon to boil over.

Did Alzheimer’s research get Wakefielded? It’s sounds more and more likely that the research paper’s pointing to the Amyloid Beta plaque theory of Alzheimers, fabricated data.

Potential fabrication in research images threatens key theory of Alzheimers disease | Science | AAAS

Science.org But even before Schrag’s investigation, the spotty evidence that Aβ*56 plays a role in Alzheimer’s had raised eyebrows. Wilcock has long doubted studies that claim to use “purified” Aβ*56. Such oligomers are notoriously unstable, converting to other oligomer types spontaneously. Multiple types can be present in a sample even after purification efforts, making it hard to say any cognitive effects are due to Aβ*56 alone, she notes—assuming it exists. In fact, Wilcock and others say, several labs have tried and failed to find Aβ*56, although few have published those findings. Journals are often uninterested in negative results, and researchers can be reluctant to contradict a famous investigator.

An exception was Harvard University’s Dennis Selkoe, a leading advocate of the amyloid and toxic oligomer hypotheses, who has cited the Nature paper at least 13 times. In two 2008 papers, Selkoe said he could not find Aβ*56 in human fluids or tissues.

Selkoe examined Schrag’s dossier on Lesné’s papers at Science’s request, and says he finds it credible and well supported. He did not see manipulation in every suspect image, but says, “There are certainly at least 12 or 15 images where I would agree that there is no other explanation” than manipulation. One—an image in the Nature paper displaying purified Aβ*56—shows “very worrisome” signs of tampering, Selkoe says. The same image reappeared in a different paper, co-authored by Lesné and Ashe, 5 years later. Many other images in Lesné’s papers might be improper—more than enough to challenge the body of work, Selkoe adds.
Man, I’m really enjoying this article, thanks for sharing it.
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  #1642  
Old 09-01-2022, 10:13 PM
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Default Re: Drive by science

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ari View Post
That’s a nice shot!

I was curious so I did some searching. It would appear Bird Banding Laboratories was under Fish and Wildlife from 1920 until 1993, where the Interior picked a bunch of groups from different divisions to form a new one, the NBS, National Biological Service. It wavered especially under Republican control and in 1996 instead of being undone entirely it had its budget reduced and was put under the control of the USGS, as their Biological Resources Division, specifically to protect it from further Republican cuts. The banding group itself seems to have changed little besides gaining advantage of new fangled computer programing and internet connectivity the USGS brought along with it in the 90s.

Whatever happened to the National Biological Survey? | BioScience | Oxford Academic
BY ANY NAME, BIOLOGICAL SERVICE APPEARS TO BE ENDANGERED SPECIES - The Washington Post
My bird-banding report has hit a dead end, of sorts.

Quote:
Unfortunately, we cannot process your report immediately.
The bander has not yet submitted the data for this band so we are unable to process your report at this time.
I was included on the email to the person who did the banding, and they replied to me, so I sent them a bit more information and offered them more pictures, if it helps them.

I learned recently that one of the neighbors had called a local wildlife rescue to deal with a fledgling hawk that fell out of the nest, and I relayed that information, too.
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